Shaping the Web

Shaping the Web Illustration
Illustration by Jaz Brooks

Who spoke

Jon Hicks
Graphic Designer, Hicksdesign @hicksdesign hicksdesign.co.uk

Jon Hicks

Jon Hicks is a Graphic Designer based in Witney, Oxfordshire. He runs Hicksdesign with his wife Leigh and is most widely known for his work on the Firefox, Mailchimp, and Shopify logos, as well as recent projects such as the Skype emoticon redesign and Spotify Iconset. He also quite literally wrote the book on Icons: The Icon Handbook for Five Simple Steps Publishing.

Icon Design Process

Icons are more than just pretty decorative graphics for sites and applications; they are little miracle workers. They summarize and explain actions, provide direction, offer feedback and even break through language barriers. Whether you design icons yourself or just need to be able to work with them, this session will take you through the whole process of designing and deploying resolution-independent icons—from the initial brief, to choosing the format or method to deploy them. On the way, it will cover choosing the right metaphor, achieving visual balance, and using SVG for scalable and lightweight distribution.

VideoSlides
Jake Giltsoff
Designer & Front-End Developer, Typekit @designbyjake jakegiltsoff.co.uk

Jake Giltsoff

Jake is a designer & front-end developer at Adobe Typekit and is passionate about type, typography, and the web. He was previously nominated for young designer of the year and once was invited to meet the queen. When not looking at a screen, he will either be riding a bike or drinking coffee.

A practical guide to using SVGs on the web

We live in the age of pixels — many many pixels. As designers and developers of the web, pixels are at times both our friends and our enemies. We want everything to look sharp and nice for anyone who uses any of the websites we work on, but need to keep file sizes down for performance. There is pretty much only one way to go with icons, logos and illustrations on the web — SVGs. Scalable Vector Graphics can look crisp at all screen resolutions, they can have super small file sizes, and they can be easily edited and modified. Sounds great, but what’s the best way to actually implement them? Let’s take a look at some different scenarios and see which option is best, with a few extra tips and tricks along the way.

VideoSlides